Girls With Dreams and Women With Cards

Natasha Ravinand is the founder of “She Dreams in Code,” a nonprofit focused on increasing opportunities for middle school girls to engage in coding. She is also the author of Girls With Dreams: Inspiring Girls to Code and Create in the New Generation. In this book, Ntasha interviews several women in engineering and technology in order to assemble a compendium of inspiration for others like her, who want to engage in technology without the usual and common obstacles.

Natasha Ravinand is a Junior at Northwood High School (Irvine, CA). She is considered to be one of the top high schoolers in the coding world. Hello world. @natasharavinand
Here’s two facts you need to know. 1) Only 25% of the adults engaged in science and technology (STEM) are women. 2) This is a HUGE percentage compared to what it was only a few years ago. So, we are in a bad place, but also, we are moving quickly out of that place.

Expect the patriarch to grab the reins. Indeed, it already has, with the marriage of the technology boys club and the MRA movement, not to mention other nefarious groups.

Girls With Dreams: Inspiring Girls to Code and Create in the New Generation is new, self published, inexpensive, and cool. Buy the book.

I promised Women with Cards. This is just a reminder to check out my sister’s project, “The Educational Card Project.” This is physical scientists who are women made into playing cars. A lot of STEM teachers use playing cards in various exercises, or should if they don’t. This allows them to sneak 52 women who have accomplishments in the physical sciences and related fields into the classroom. Check it out here. If you as a person buy a deck of cards (but really, buy two decks!) a portion of the take goes to provide cards for free in classrooms. Also, you can simply donate cash money to the project. So, go do that!

Spread the love

One thought on “Girls With Dreams and Women With Cards

  1. Good to see things like this. Comparing the percentages of women in (data) engineering positions at places like Google and other big companies to men in the same position gives a depressing message, although it has gotten better in the last few years. (Put aside any messages from folks who deny there is a problem or that women aren’t as qualified for STEM work as men — debunked ideas don’t need to be addressed.)

    It is even more interesting to look at the situation in China, where the big AI companies (who are, in many ways, ahead of the game here) have percentages of women in all roles that are higher across the board than companies here.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.