Peak Trump

A man works tirelessly for months, acquiring parts, assembling them, making a machine that grows larger every day and eventually takes the intended form. Eventually it is ready. He rolls the machine to the edge of a cliff, climes into a makeshift chair near the center of it, and with help from his neighbor (who we may assume does not like him too much), pushes off.

And it flies! Continue reading Peak Trump

Spread the love

The Nunes Memo is out, here it is

This is a memo from the White House to Devin Nunes telling Nunes it is OK to release the memo, followed by the memo itself.

(At this point you may want to know about this guy, the person running against Nunes for his seat in the House.)

The memo is from the staff of the House Intelligence Committee to the majority (Republican) members of that committee, with the subject line “Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act Abuses at the Department of Justice and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.” Continue reading The Nunes Memo is out, here it is

Spread the love

Why I will caucus for Rebecca Otto on Tuesday

This Tuesday, February 6, Minnesotans will attend their precinct caucuses. There will be an essentially meaningless straw poll for Governor, and delegates will be selected to go on to the next level of conventioneering. I intend to vote for Auditor Rebecca Otto in the straw poll, and to join with others to represent my precinct in support of her candidacy for Governor.

There are a lot of reasons for this, but I’ll outline a few. Continue reading Why I will caucus for Rebecca Otto on Tuesday

Spread the love

Mechanical Keyboards: What are they and which one do you want?

Once upon a time there was the Northgate OmniKey Keyboard, most notably the OmniKey Plus. It was the best keyboard ever. It was sturdy, mechanical, and proffered a plethora of function keys. It was heavy, meaty, robust. You could pound on it an it would stay in place on your desk and just take it. It did not ghost and it did not miss a stroke. And it went “clickity clickity click” when you typed on it. And all was good. Continue reading Mechanical Keyboards: What are they and which one do you want?

Spread the love

Measurements of the human male kakadodo organ, does it matter and why?

This is a repost of an item I put up in 2013 based on some interesting scientific research. Today, I was told by Google that if I do not take the article down, I will lose my ad sense qualification. Google and companies like Google are giant behemoths that do not have humans to whom one can talk when they do something boneheaded like this. So, I’ll unpublish the original item and post it here with a change in title. Also, words that might be interpreted by an unintelligent robot at Google as violating policy have been changed. Continue reading Measurements of the human male kakadodo organ, does it matter and why?

Spread the love

How Did They Make The Periodic Table?

Good question. In short, Dmitri Mendeleev noticed that certain properties of the elements repeated, i.e., were periodic. This allowed him to create an initial framework for the elements that had rather intriguing empty spaces. In this way, he predicted as yet undiscovered elements. A periodic table. Eventually these discoveries happened. Continue reading How Did They Make The Periodic Table?

Spread the love

Evangelical Christianity in America is Dead

Sorry to all my Evangelical Christian friends, but it is true.

Since this form of Protestantism has a built in way out based on its structural granularity, so most evangelical Christians can say, “Oh, that’s not me, that’s not my church, that’s the other guy,” most of you (talking to the Evangelicals here) will believe for a time that you are not tarnished by your religious leaders sidling up to a man who appears by all accounts to be a sex abuser, thief, and general asshat. But you don’t really get to do that. Continue reading Evangelical Christianity in America is Dead

Spread the love

Cheap Book Notes

I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong is now on Kindle for $2.99. I’ve seen it on Kindle for $1.99, told you about it, and maybe you bought it then. But if you didn’t,

Since we are on the topic of cheap books, here’s another one of interest, a book I read years ago and liked so I assume you will like too. Robert Massie produced a number of what I think are pretty good historical biographies, and one of them is Peter the Great: His Life and World. This book was published quite a while back, so maybe revisionism in history has made it less relevant, but I’ thinking not. Anyway, it is $2.99 in Kindle form, so for pretty cheap you can learn about the Russian Czar who collected and bred giants and dwarfs, made significant advances in dental torture, spent many a lazy Sunday afternoon personally carrying out beheading on behalf of the government, stole to the low countries to secretly learn how to make boats, and who brought Russia into the modern era.

Massie also wrote Nicholas and Alexandra: The Classic Account of the Fall of the Romanov Dynasty, Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman, Dreadnought: Britain, Germany, and the Coming of the Great War, and The Romanovs: the Final Chapter, so you can get your fill of British White Culture History but all very well written.

What you might not know is that Massie was originally drawn into this historical foray because his own son was born with hemophilia, as was Czar Nichols’s son. Massie and his significant other wrote about this in two books: Journey and A Song in the Night: A Memoir of Resilience. The son, Bob Massie, is a social justice and climate change activist of note, and at the moment is is seeking the Democratic nomination for Governor of Massachusetts. I have no idea what the gubinitorial field looks like in the Bay State right now, but Massie is pretty impressive. (Added: OK, I just looked at the field, and they are all impressive.)

Also, as long as I’ve got your attention, right NOW and maybe for a very limited time you can get any of these iOS apps for free.

Spread the love

The Charge of the Light Brigade: A Cautionary Tale

First, a little clarification on the “Light Brigade.” This term originally referred to a British military unit of light (as in not heavy) cavalry that engaged with the Russians (the enemy in this story) during the Crimean War, in October, 1854. The brigade, made up of Light Dragoons, Lancers, and Hussars, was tasked to take over some territory from which Turkish (not the enemy) troops had been vanquished, in order to prevent the Russians from recovering artillery pieces left there. But somehow, there was a miscommunication, and the Light Brigade was sent to attack a well fortified and entrenched enemy unit that they had no business dealing with. This assault gained no ground and 110 of about 670 troops were killed, 161 wounded. Continue reading The Charge of the Light Brigade: A Cautionary Tale

Spread the love

Minnesotans Go To Caucus

In just a few days, Minnesota will have its precinct caucuses. All the different political parties will caucus at exactly the same time, at different locations, by law, to make it difficult for some joker to go to more than one (which would be illegal, but nearly impossible to enforce).

At the caucus, we will do the following: Continue reading Minnesotans Go To Caucus

Spread the love

Dear Candidate For Office: About your environmental policy…

Over the last five months, and with increasing frequency, I find myself listening to candidates for office talk about their environmental policies. I’ve looked at the policies of candidates for Minnesota Governor, for US Congress in three different districts, and for Minnesota Senate and House in numerous districts. There is a lot of variation across the candidates. Only one candidate so far has demonstrated a) rich knowledge of the subject, b) well formulated and detailed policy, and c) policy that I find very good and agree with. This is not a post about that candidate, but rather, all the other candidates.

The other candidates have positions that run from “seems kinda OK” to “is maybe mostly OK” but none are good enough. The most common position on a given environmental issue is for the candidate to indicate that they think it is very important. Sadly, when it comes to climate change specifically, the most common position is for the candidate to acknowledge that climate change is real.

Sorry, but you don’t get points for knowing how to write your name on the top of the exam. Continue reading Dear Candidate For Office: About your environmental policy…

Spread the love