The rise of Skeptical Science

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The site, not the thing. From the YouTube site:

Everyone at Skeptical Science spends a lot of their time reading the scientific literature and listening to experts. Without that we wouldn’t be able to write all the material that’s published on Skeptical Science. It’s a lot of work, especially when you do this with a critical eye. Our goal, after all, is to ensure that what we write reflects the scientific literature on the subject as accurately as possible.

The materials created by Skeptical Science are used by teachers, politicians, and of course by users on the internet to rebut climate myths. Thanks to this a lot of people have seen materials produced by us, even though they might not know that they have.

The website Skeptical Science wasn’t created overnight, nor was the team behind it assembled instantly. It started small with John Cook starting the website and publishing the first rebuttals to climate myths. As I wasn’t familiar with the story of how Skeptical Science evolved to the website it is today I had the idea to interview John about this. Despite John constantly saying “I’m just not that interesting” I eventually managed to get him in front of the camera to tell the story behind Skeptical Science.

The article released with this video can be found here:

The transcript, used resources, and citations for this video can be found here:

You can support me and the content that I create through Patreon.
https://www.patreon.com/collinmaessen

Interviews filmed in collaboration with University of Queensland, Skeptical Science, and Peter Sinclair. Full interviews available April 2015 in ‘Making Sense of Climate Science Denial‘.


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3 thoughts on “The rise of Skeptical Science

  1. Thanks for mentioning the video I created. 🙂

    Though there isn’t an embed, or link, to the video. 😉

    [Sorry, something went wrong there! Thanks for the heads up. The video is now embedded. -gtl]

  2. The web site is still my primary “go-to” site when I need to know the facts, and when I need to explain the facts to someone else.

  3. Thanks, Greg. 🙂

    I had a suspicion that maybe a glitch ate the embed or something else happened. Such things can happen now and then when you add content to a post. I have to say that I really appreciate it when someone shares a video, with the current way YouTube handles subscriptions it can make a huge difference.

    I also appreciate the two links to my Patreon page. 😉

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