Category Archives: Other

Dawkins’ Delusion Cheap (and some other books)

Whether you find Richard Dawkins a suitable leader in your personal mythology or prefer him roasted on the spit of MRA fueled internecine warfare among skeptics and science supporters, you still have to read The God Delusion by him. Cheap now on Kindle.

Setting Free the Bears: A Novel (Ballantine Reader’s Circle) by John Irving was published in 1968, not long after I learned to read. I think it was about the fifth or sixth adult level book I read (the first was this collection, the second and third were this one and this one, and I imagine all this added up to a certain amount of psychological … something). I never read juvenile fiction because the genre simply did not exist at that time. So, Setting Free the Bears: A Novel was in that set of books that I read because I need to read something other than Dr. Seuss, but that I probably read to early to really appreciate it. I bring it up today simply because it is cheap on Kindle. I look forward to reading it soon to see what I missed the first time around.

So Terrible a Storm by Curt Brown is cheap now. It is about the Thanksgiving Storm of 1905. We learned all about this storm this last summer when we visited the Split Rock lighthouse up north of Duluth on Lake Superior. This storm was a key event in the history of shipping and safety, much like the Titanic’s encounter with the iceberg changed shipping in the North Atlantic (no boat has been sunk by an ice berg since the US, Canada, and Norway deployed their iceberg response to that event).

I’ve never read The Man Who Fell to Earth by Walter Tevis, but I’ll bet a lot of you either have and would like the two buck version of it for your growing but ever tiny library of eBooks, or would simply like to read it for the first time.

I myself am not big on corporate or industry leader biographies, though I suspect I would enjoy them. I just have too much other stuff to read right now. But if you enjoy such books, you will want to know that Intel Trinity,The: How Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore, and Andy Grove Built the World’s Most Important Company by Michael S. Malone is now 3 bucks.

Happy book collecting and reading!

Some cheap kindle books: Starving, Starving on Mars, Brutal Murder,

These books are cheap in Kindle form right now.

First, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich: A Novel (FSG Classics). I mention this here simply because it was a book that influenced me as a kid. Made me realize that starvation was a thing.

If you’ve not read The Martian: A Novel, read it. Fun book. This is where science fiction is enhanced significantly but science and math geekiness. Destine to become a classic.

I know a lot of you are fans of forensic fiction. Puruant to that interest, these two books by Patricia Cornwell: Ripper: The Secret Life of Walter Sickert [Kindle in Motion] and Chasing the Ripper (Kindle Single), in which life imitates art.

Many mostly science books really cheap

The exact price of each of these books will vary. Some of these prices are likely to expire soon. The prices range from free to about three bucks. The exact price will depend of if you are prime member, but for most of them it should not matter.

The first one is a shock to me, I did not know, of I forgot, that Sean B. Carroll had written this book. It looks fascinating. Continue reading Many mostly science books really cheap

Cheap books: Inside Scientology, Guns of August

Two items I know many of you have been planning to read someday, currently cheap on Kindle:
Beyond Belief: My Secret Life Inside Scientology and My Harrowing Escape

Jenna Miscavige Hill, niece of Church of Scientology leader David Miscavige, was raised as a Scientologist but left the controversial religion in 2005. In Beyond Belief, she shares her true story of life inside the upper ranks of the sect, details her experiences as a member Sea Org—the church’s highest ministry, speaks of her “disconnection” from family outside of the organization, and tells the story of her ultimate escape.

In this tell-all memoir, complete with family photographs from her time in the Church, Jenna Miscavige Hill, a prominent critic of Scientology who now helps others leave the organization, offers an insider’s profile of the beliefs, rituals, and secrets of the religion that has captured the fascination of millions, including some of Hollywood’s brightest stars such as Tom Cruise and John Travolta.

The Guns of August: The Outbreak of World War I; Barbara W. Tuchman’s Great War Series (Modern Library 100 Best Nonfiction Books)

In this landmark, Pulitzer Prize–winning account, renowned historian Barbara W. Tuchman re-creates the first month of World War I: thirty days in the summer of 1914 that determined the course of the conflict, the century, and ultimately our present world. Beginning with the funeral of Edward VII, Tuchman traces each step that led to the inevitable clash. And inevitable it was, with all sides plotting their war for a generation. Dizzyingly comprehensive and spectacularly portrayed with her famous talent for evoking the characters of the war’s key players, Tuchman’s magnum opus is a classic for the ages.

Ed Yong Contains Multitudes But His Book Is Now Cheap On Kindle

I assume for just a day or two, I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong is available for $2.99

Joining the ranks of popular science classics like The Botany of Desire and The Selfish Gene, a groundbreaking, wondrously informative, and vastly entertaining examination of the most significant revolution in biology since Darwin—a “microbe’s-eye view” of the world that reveals a marvelous, radically reconceived picture of life on earth.

Every animal, whether human, squid, or wasp, is home to millions of bacteria and other microbes. Ed Yong, whose humor is as evident as his erudition, prompts us to look at ourselves and our animal companions in a new light—less as individuals and more as the interconnected, interdependent multitudes we assuredly are.

The microbes in our bodies are part of our immune systems and protect us from disease. In the deep oceans, mysterious creatures without mouths or guts depend on microbes for all their energy. Bacteria provide squid with invisibility cloaks, help beetles to bring down forests, and allow worms to cause diseases that afflict millions of people.

Many people think of microbes as germs to be eradicated, but those that live with us—the microbiome—build our bodies, protect our health, shape our identities, and grant us incredible abilities. In this astonishing book, Ed Yong takes us on a grand tour through our microbial partners, and introduces us to the scientists on the front lines of discovery. It will change both our view of nature and our sense of where we belong in it.

Logan’s Run

The book, now on Kindle cheap. You may not remember the movie, but if you do, you probably want the book.

Logan’s Run: Vintage Movie Classics (A Vintage Movie Classic) by William Nolan

The bestselling dystopian novel that inspired the 1970s science-fiction classic starring Michael York, Jenny Agutter, and Richard Jordan.

In 2116, it is against the law to live beyond the age of twenty-one years. When the crystal flower in the palm of your hand turns from red to black, you have reached your Lastday and you must report to a Sleepshop for processing. But the human will to survive is strong—stronger than any mere law.

Logan 3 is a Sandman, an enforcer who hunts down those Runners who refuse to accept Deep Sleep. The day before Logan’s palmflower shifts to black, a Runner accidentally reveals that he was racing toward a goal: Sanctuary. With this information driving him forward, Logan 3 assumes the role of the hunted and becomes a Runner.

Greene and Le Guin Cheap Kindle Books

The Birthday of the World: And Other Stories

For more than four decades, Ursula K. Le Guin has enthralled readers with her imagination, clarity, and moral vision. The recipient of numerous literary prizes, including the National Book Award, the Kafka Award, and five Hugo and five Nebula Awards, this renowned writer has, in each story and novel, created a provocative, ever-evolving universe filled with diverse worlds and rich characters reminiscent of our earthly selves. Now, in The Birthday of the World, this gifted artist returns to these worlds in eight brilliant short works, including a never-before-published novella, each of which probes the essence of humanity.

Here are stories that explore complex social interactions and troublesome issues of gender and sex; that define and defy notions of personal relationships and of society itself; that examine loyalty, survival, and introversion; that bring to light the vicissitudes of slavery and the meaning of transformation, religion, and history.

The first six tales in this spectacular volume are set in the author’s signature world of the Ekumen, “my pseudo-coherent universe with holes in the elbows,” as Le Guin describes it — a world made familiar in her award-winning novel The Left Hand of Darkness. The seventh, title story was hailed by Publishers Weekly as “remarkable . . . a standout.” The final offering in the collection, Paradises Lost, is a mesmerizing novella of space exploration and the pursuit of happiness.

In her foreword, Ursula K. Le Guin writes, “to create difference-to establish strangeness-then to let the fiery arc of human emotion leap and close the gap: this acrobatics of the imagination fascinates and satisfies me as no other.” In The Birthday of the World, this gifted literary acrobat exhibits a dazzling array of skills that will fascinate and satisfy us all.

The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos

The bestselling author of The Elegant Universe and The Fabric of the Cosmos tackles perhaps the most mind-bending question in modern physics and cosmology: Is our universe the only universe?

There was a time when “universe” meant all there is. Everything. Yet, a number of theories are converging on the possibility that our universe may be but one among many parallel universes populating a vast multiverse. Here, Briane Greene, one of our foremost physicists and science writers, takes us on a breathtaking journey to a multiverse comprising an endless series of big bangs, a multiverse with duplicates of every one of us, a multiverse populated by vast sheets of spacetime, a multiverse in which all we consider real are holographic illusions, and even a multiverse made purely of math–and reveals the reality hidden within each.

Using his trademark wit and precision, Greene presents a thrilling survey of cutting-edge physics and confronts the inevitable question: How can fundamental science progress if great swaths of reality lie beyond our reach? The Hidden Reality is a remarkable adventure through a world more vast and strange than anything we could have imagined.

If the Catholic Church was a secular entity it would be shut down. So, let’s shut it down.

Clergy Abuse Hotline: 888-538-8551

I wonder if the penny has finally dropped. Our society needs to finally come to grips with the fact that religion is not inherently good, and should get no pass just for existing. Rather, it should be given close scrutiny.

Giving religious organizations, religious people, or religion itself any status above cultism is dangerous, especially to children. Just do not do it. The sex slavery and abuse within the Catholic Church is widespread and has gone on unchecked for who knows how long (centuries?) and it has been allowed to happen because police, government officials, politicians, and regular citizens give sway to anything religious.

The Pennsylvania AG and a grand jury has compiles an extensive report on sexual predation and related matters in six of Pennsylvania’s eight diocese. You can read it here.

From WaPo, a sampling of the horrors:

In Erie, a 7-year-old boy was sexually abused by a priest who then told him he should go to confession and confess his “sins” to that same priest.

Another boy was repeatedly raped from ages 13 to 15 by a priest who bore down so hard on the boy’s back that it caused severe spine injuries. He became addicted to painkillers and later died of an overdose.

One victim in Pittsburgh was forced to pose naked as Christ on the cross while priests photographed him with a Polaroid camera. Priests gave the boy and others gold cross necklaces to mark them as being “groomed” for abuse.

The report makes clear that few criminal cases may result from the massive investigation.

“As a consequence of the coverup, almost every instance of abuse we found is too old to be prosecuted,” the report said.