What To Expect With The Super Blood Moon Eclipse

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A lunar eclipse happens only during a full moon. Some full moons happen when the moon is closest to the Earth, and these are called “Super Moons.” Under some conditions, a lot of light gets round the Earth’s shadow during an eclipse, and this is red light. All three are happening at the same time this weekend, which gives us the rare Super Blood Moon Eclipse.

Here are the things to watch for during the Super Blood Moon Eclipse.

  • Since the Moon will be VERY close to the earth, there is a risk of it running into things. For this reason, climbers will be held at mid level base camps on Everest and K2, and observation decks on large sky scrapers will be closed.
  • Since the Moon is a critical part of the Zodiac, a very strong Super Blood Moon Eclipse can rearrange it. This is how we got Gemini — that was originally two separate constellations. Astrologers at the National Observatory are concerned that during this Super Blood Moon Eclipse, Leo may be knocked into Capricorn, which could endanger the goat. If the worst happens, those born between December 22nd and January 2nd will be Sagittarius, and those born between January 3rd and January 19th will be Aquarius.
  • Tides will be affected. Instead of having two tidal cycles a day, the tide will remain high for a couple of days. This will have a negative effect on the availability of clam rolls in New England. The Governor of Massachusetts has ordered taco trucks supplied by FEMA to be deployed around the Greater Boston Metro.
  • Lunacy will, simply put, run amok.
  • Conservators working at megalith sites such as Stonehenge will be on high alert for the arrival of more than the usual numbers of Inferi and Zombies.
  • Black cats will turn a shade of dark greenish blue. It will wear off after a few days.

There will likely be other effects, but Super Blood Moons are unpredictable, and every time one happens, some new thing previously unexpected occurs. It is always a bad thing, so be prepared. Lock your doors and windows, and make sure your Mormon Closet is full of Spam.


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17 thoughts on “What To Expect With The Super Blood Moon Eclipse

  1. Love it. Reminds me of the days when I would give bogus lectures to classes of geology majors on April 1st to see how long they would just write notes before realization set in. I gave it up the day I completely fooled essentially the same people with each of two different lectures (they were in two of my classes. Too easy; fish in a barrel. My favorite bogus lecture was an introduction to the Sherwin-Williams theory of continental drip. (This may not register nowadays; it was a long time ago.)

    1. Excellent.

      I used to do a bogus lecture on the hot headed naked mole rate of the Antarctic. It was convenient since it had been written up in the April 1 edition of, I think, Discover magazine.

    2. Odd, I entered both my name and email address and I came up as “Anonymous.”

      The Taylor & Francis link was me.

  2. Sadly, this eclipse is not visible from my longitude, but I did catch the one last year. Very impressive, and completely understandable why pre-scientific era folk had such strong mythologies associated with these events.

  3. Greg: “I used to do a bogus lecture on the hot headed naked mole rate of the Antarctic. It was convenient since it had been written up in the April 1 edition of, I think, Discover magazine.”

    I believe you said that you also referenced the SciAm article about the flower-faced snouters of the Hi-Yi-Yi Archipelago, when I happened to mention it a few years ago.

  4. Sadly not done in humor: our local weatherman talked about getting out and seeing this eclipse, and repeatedly stressed that you didn’t need strong glasses or welder’s goggles to look at a lunar eclipse. (Yes, he did it with a straight face, and there were no chuckles from the rest of the folks on the newscast.)
    The thought that there are people who need to be told that naked-eye viewing of a lunar eclipse is safe is depressing.

    1. The environment in the larger sense is largely irrelevant to many people in the U. S. and probably other developed countries. Various climate-controlled (or at least moderated) buildings and vehicles are mostly where the majority of people are to be found. It takes an effort to reconnect with the world outside.

    2. It would have been funnier if he convinced an entire viewing area worth of people to wander around at night with welders’ masks on!

    3. Dean, this is actually a telling indictment on the level of scientific understanding of much of the adult population of the USA – and of Australia (we certainly aren’t any better)… Too many lay people hear only “eclipse” and their singular (and Pavlovian) response is “look-at-eclipse-go-blind.” This is exactly why folk in this cohort can be fooled to think any sort of nonsense about climate science, immunisation, vitamins, and the panoply of other woo fields so readily swallowed by the ignorati.

      And courtesy of Drs Dunning and Kruger these people can be understood to bask unphased in the self-confident delusions of their own apparent intellectual/educational adequacies. If only that delusion could be broken and they made to perceive their deeply flawed understandings. I’m sure though that this is prohibited by an undiscovered law of thermodynamics akin to entropy – Teh Stupid overall can only ever increase, even if small pockets can be reduced in size with the input of much work…

      [Oo, just noticed the new edit function!

      “Click to Edit – 3 minutes and 37 seconds”

      I like that it’s set on a timer – that’s an elegant solution to the reservations I expressed a couple fo weeks ago.

      Sweet!]

  5. It would have been funnier if he convinced an entire viewing area worth of people to wander around at night with welders’ masks on!

    True. We already have a large percentage of people who believe immigration is out of control and autism is the result of vaccination, so it’s a reasonable bet some there are locals dim enough to be convinced to do that.

  6. It would have been funnier if he convinced an entire viewing area worth of people to wander around at night with welders’ masks on!

    On another light note: I gave a class a small probability simulation project for a few extra credit points. I received a text from one student:

    “Is the fact that Corey and Hart only produce sunglasses at night important in this assignment?”

    It made me feel old.

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