The Mystery of the Carl Vinson

<li>On September 11th, 1640, a Dutch armada preparing to attack the New World Spanish settlements was lost to a storm, thus changing the course of Dutch, Spanish, and New World history. </li>


<li>On January 2nd, 1678, an entire fleet of French naval ships was lost off the Venezuelan coat, changing forever the history of France.  And Venezuela.  <a target="_blank" href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0060198184/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0060198184&linkCode=as2&tag=grlasbl0a-20&linkId=b83eba754ac7216967259cba5ee67675">*</a><img src="//ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=grlasbl0a-20&l=am2&o=1&a=0060198184" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" /></li>


<li>On or about April 19th, 2017, the United States lost the battle group running with the USS Carl Vinson, somewhere in the Pacific.  This altered forever the credibility of the American Military around the world.  </li>
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4 thoughts on “The Mystery of the Carl Vinson

  1. Perhaps more relevant to this discussion is the Hakata Bay typhoon. On 15 August 1281 the typhoon destroyed a Mongolian fleet attempting to invade Japan, changing forever the history of eastern Asia.

    The term “kamikaze”, which means “divine wind”, originally referred to this typhoon and another one in 1274 which destroyed an earlier Mongol invasion fleet.

  2. The whole “armada” fiasco reeks of arising from comments by groups of buffoons who never spoke to each other or anyone who would understand what was going on.

    That in addition to the asinine notion that North Korea poses any kind of threat to the United States, as the clown in chief has been asserting.

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