Knee Update (or, “My leg, my leg!!!”)

… for those interested …

I had a pretty good visit to surgeon today. To date I have been instructed to not use my quads, but for the next two weeks I’m instructed to use them in a limited way (in a highly controlled manner). At the same time, I’m to carry out more aggressive joint flexibility work.

After two weeks, I’m to shift to more aggressive work with quads under supervision of physical therapists. Interestingly, he says I can drive whenever I can get in the car and work the pedals. So maybe a few weeks. Strangely, the LAST step in the process will be removing the brace. The brace stays on well into cane-use period, which in turn probably starts in about six weeks.

The Alien bump object I had mentioned on Facebook is likely an internal stitch, which will either go away or he’ll cut out at a later time. Pain levels are not really expected to go down soon, but they aren’t bad now, and the pain is increasingly meaningless which makes it quite tolerable.

So, regarding what I can and can’t do, I’m looking at two weeks with no change, followed by a couple weeks of aggressive effort to make change happen, during which time I’ll start being able to do things I’m restricted from doing now.

Most importantly, he did not look at my knee, turn pale, and say “Oh my god, what have we done… WHAT HAVE WE DONE!!!!” … or anything like that.

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13 thoughts on “Knee Update (or, “My leg, my leg!!!”)

  1. Malpractice insurance companies instruct their insured doctors to NEVER make statements such as, “O MY GOD” or “That’s just a normal complication, it will probably grow back.” Did you hear him yell “Holy crap, we can write a paper about this patient!” after he left the exam room?

  2. You seemed to write better when the pain was more excruciating.

    An effect in cause that helped focus the mind perhaps.

    I rather miss that.

    – Bill

  3. Look at their faces. The “doctor” who cast my arm so tightly that another bone broke and my nerves were compressed, causing the need for major surgery and an external fixator, turned pasty white when he removed the cast and saw my arm. I was also looking a bit pale, I’m sure, plus feeling nauseous. He didn’t have to say a word, in other words, but he did reply to my, “What’s WRONG with my ARM?” The rest is classified.

    Yeah, your writing was different but I attribute that to the pain meds. Did you also LOVE everyone? Or just about everyone?

  4. You seemed to write better when the pain was more excruciating.

    I rather miss that.

    Considering how popular Greg is in some quarters, it’s best to avoid giving them ideas.

  5. Most importantly, he did not look at my knee, turn pale, and say “Oh my god, what have we done… WHAT HAVE WE DONE!!!!” … or anything like that.

    Like: “Vhat? VHAT? Frritz, you idiot! You have brrought the wrrong jarr! Zis is an abnormal knee!”

  6. Greg, my husband had a knee replacement three years ago. The pain was excruciating and pain meds essential. I have not felt, but experienced this kind of paid with him. Kind thoughts headed your way. Keep on top of the pain, it’s the only way.
    Wendy

  7. Ha. Interesting. The connection between my use of narcotics and what I’ve written is actually not really discernible from reading my blog. The correlation is spurious. For example, right now, I’m on maximum dosage, and this comment is perfectly understudgable.

  8. Of course the quacks didn’t panic – that would be unprofessional. If you showed up and it was all smelly and gangrenous they’re still required to act as if that stuff happens all the time and is no big deal. Even when things don’t go right, never admit responsibility! Hey, it works for the politicians and corporate managers (and especially the bank industry).

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